A wet ten days in Scotland

Well here I am again, having been silent for several weeks after updating the blog on my photo website I have decided that maybe there is a place for this blog as well as more of a diary.

We set off for Scotland on May 2nd and it rained all the way to our overnight stop near Carlisle. It rained all night and was still at it next morning when we set off for Onich on the West coast of Scotland. It rained all the way and alongside Loch Lomond the road was flooded by the many waterfalls pouring off the mountains and across the road. A narrow road at the best of times it made for interesting driving! The Caravan Club site at Onich was a welcome sight when we arrived, Club sites are all well run, clean and tidy and most have excellent facilities. We had booked to stay three nights before moving on to The Isle of Skye for just over a week.

May 4th, Georgina’s birthday, (which I had not prepared for – black mark) was better and we hoped we were turning the corner weather wise. We toured Loch Linnie, the Ben Nevis region and the Glenfinnan monument before heading back to Corpach basin at the Fort William end of the Caledonian canal and back to base and I managed a few reasonable shots ronded off with lovely evening light across the loch at the camp site.

A winding road in the Ben Nevis range.
A winding road in the Ben Nevis range.
The Glenfinnan monument was erected to commemorate those who fought and died in the cause of Prince Charles Edward Stuart better known as The Young Pretender or Bonnie Prince Charlie.
The Glenfinnan monument was erected to commemorate those who fought and died in the cause of Prince Charles Edward Stuart better known as The Young Pretender or Bonnie Prince Charlie.
View of Corpach basin at the Fort William end of the Caledonian canal.
View of Corpach basin at the Fort William end of the Caledonian canal.
A swan on a sea loch in Scotland.
A swan on a sea loch in Scotland.
A clump of Daffodils with mountains behind.
A clump of Daffodils with mountains behind.
Caravans and motorhomes on the side of Loch Linnhe at sunset.
Caravans and motorhomes on the side of Loch Linnhe at sunset.

May 5th is my birthday it was wet again and rained all day. The only photos that day were of some large yellow flowers growing in a damp area near Oban. They turned out to be Skunk Cabbage.

American skunk-cabbage, Lysichiton americanus, is a non-native invasive plant.
American skunk-cabbage, Lysichiton americanus, is a non-native invasive plant.

The journey to Skye on May 6th was mostly wet and windy and when we arrived, after crossing the Skye bridge, the weather forecast was for such high winds the site owners strapped the caravan down to some large concrete ground anchors in case we got blown over! The site was the poorest we have ever been on and with the weather forecast being for continuing bad weather for another week we decided the next day not only to leave the site but Skye as well and head further south in search of some better weather.

Te wet weather continued on the 7th but by the next day we were at Killin and the weather picked up and stayed with us for two days

Road sign warning of red squirrels.
Road sign warning of red squirrels.
Felled logs at a forestry in central Scotland.
Felled logs at a forestry in central Scotland.
View of Loch Earn.
View of Loch Earn.

but by 10th it rained so heavily all day that we went out only to allow the dog to do the necessary. The next day it was still raining and whilst we had intended to move south to the Lake District to get better weather we found that the rain was predicted to move into Cumbria as  well and we decided to give it all best and head home which meant a drive of 370 miles, a long journey in very windy weather with a caravan on the back.

For the last year or so we have been fairly lucky with the weather when we have travelled away from home so I suppose this was the price to be paid at one time or another. As it is I am looking forward to getting back to Norfolk soon.

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15 thoughts on “A wet ten days in Scotland”

  1. Sorry to hear the weather was so bad for your trip Bill. We invest a lot in these excursions and it’s disappointing when the weather doesn’t play ball to say the least. You got some beautiful photographs nonetheless.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Sounds like you were lucky to get any photos at all, and keepers at that! Just one of those holidays that needs to be repeated but with better weather.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Gorgeous photos. I did a walking tour in Scotland several years ago and was blessed with beautiful weather the whole time we were there. It was odd because at the same time we were having gorgeous weather, London was having torrential rains. I guess I was very lucky. I loved Scotland and would like to go back.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I am sorry my home country gave you such a rough trot with the weather. So much of that area is about exploring the great outdoors and taking in the scenery so the rain can make it both miserable and boring. We once experienced seven weeks where it rained every single day. The rain varied in intensity but it made for a pretty dull seven weeks in all meanings of the word.

    I see you managed to get some cracking shots regardless. You handled the light beautifully.

    Incidentally, I did not know that the skunk cabbage was an invasive plant. I got so used to seeing it around Argyll that it didn’t cross my mind that it was non-native.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Oh dear Bill , hope Norfolk is much better and the sun shines. Sorry the weather was so poor (hope Georgina has forgiven you). Photographs are super !!

    Liked by 1 person

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